Hydration Tips from Registered Dietitians

The Healthy Hydration Toolkit: A Resource for Nutrition Professionals

Nestlé Waters has partnered with two registered dietitians, Katherine Brooking, MS, RD and Julie Upton, MS, RD to create the Healthy Hydration Toolkit. This toolkit for registered dietitians and other health professionals features the latest information about water as healthy hydration in a “ready-to-use” format for client communication. The kit includes hydration tips for parents, information about water and the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 10 surprising facts about bottled water and social media thought starters.

Download the Healthy Hydration Toolkit here.

Helpful Hydration Insights and Information

• Did you know that 20% of daily calories and 47% of added sugars come from beverages? That’s why the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans say that all food and beverages matter. 1

• Drinking simple, unsweetened, sparkling water in place of drinks with calories can help people keep added sugars in check. That’s why we made a fun and easy DIY Sparkling Water Recipe Guide to help make that transition easier.

• Making water easily available may help kids maintain a healthy weight. A recent study found that kids who had water stations in schools saw a reduction in BMI of .025 for boys and .022 for girls compared to students in schools without water jets.2 

• A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that 54% of US children were inadequately hydrated.3

• Replacing one sugar-sweetened beverage with water every day for a year will slash some 50,000 calories and 65 cups of added sugar from one’s diet in a year.4

• Enjoying calorie-free water in place of sugar-sweetened beverages, as part of a healthy diet, can help you reduce calories that provide little nutritional value.5  

• Many adults don’t get enough water. One study found that adults drank, on average, just over 1 liter or about four 8-ounce glasses of water (bottled and tap) per day. The Institute of Medicine recommends about 2.7 and 3.7 Liters of water (from all food and beverages) for women and men respectively.6 

Common Questions About Hydration:

What are some of the benefits of drinking water? 

Water is the most essential nutrient for life. It plays a role in essentially every function of the body, from flexing a muscle to maintaining metabolism. 

Some of its major functions are to: 
• Maintain a healthy core temperature
• Lubricate and cushion joints
• Protect your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues
• Remove wastes through urination, perspiration and bowel movements

What do the Dietary Guidelines for Americans: 2015-2020 advise about water

The Dietary Guidelines recommend drinking beverages with no added sugars, like water, in place of sugar-sweetened beverages. Because beverages account for almost half (47%) of all added sugars consumed by the U.S. population, choosing water in place of sugary drinks is a smart, simple way to reduce added sugars in the diet.

The Guidelines recommend limiting added sugars to less than 10% of calories per day. Below, a quick snapshot of how we stack up: • Americans currently consume, on average, more than 13% of calories per day in the form of added sugars, or almost 270 calories. 
• Children and adolescents consume the highest percentage of calories from added sugars, roughly 17%
• Sugar-sweetened beverages are the major source of added sugars in the U.S. diet.7

How much water should I drink? 

Our daily water intake needs are influenced by many factors, including: 
• Age
• Physiological conditions such as pregnancy and lactation
• Physical activity
• Body temperature and environment
• Illness and injury

In addition, some of our water requirements — roughly 20% — are met through food intake. The remaining 80% of people's total water intake comes from drinking water and beverages — including caffeinated beverages.
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has established an adequate intake (AI) for water that provides a rough guideline for fluid intake for the general population: 
• The AI for men is about 13 cups (3 liters) of total beverages a day
• The AI for women is about 9 cups (2.2 liters) of total beverages a day

1 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/chapter-2/a-closer-look-at-current-intakes-and-recommended-shifts/#beverages)
2 (Schwartz A, Leardo M, Aneja S, Elbel B. Effect of a School-Based Water Intervention on Child Body Mass Index and Obesity. JAMA Pediatrics. 2016. Available at: http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2480887.)
3 Kenney EL, Long MW, Cradock AL, Gortmaker SL. Prevalence of Inadequate Hydration Among US Children and  Disparities by Gender and Race/Ethnicity: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012.3 American Journal of Public Health. 2015;105(8): e113-e118. Available at: ttp://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302572)
4(Calculation based on sugar-sweetened beverages having 140 calories per 12 ounce serving based on publicly available information.)
5(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/chapter-2/a-closer-look-at-current-intakes-and-recommended-shifts/#beverages)
6(Drewnowski A1, Rehm CD, Constant F. Water and beverage consumption among adults in the United States: cross-sectional study using data from NHANES 2005-2010. BMC Public Health. 2013 Nov 12;13:1068.7(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/)
Institute of Medicine: Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press; 2004. Available at: https://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx)
7(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/)